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Explora Halteres, Insetos e outros!

Narrow Bench - http://adjustabledumbbellstoday.com/narrow-bench/

A late Victorian pearl and dimaond fly brooch, the brooch set with a central large blister pearl, with old brilliant-cut diamond encrusted wings and head, estimated to weigh a total of 1.30 carats, with ruby eyes, all set in silver to a yellow gold mount, gross weight 11 grams, circa 1880

FLY ( /flɑɪ/ ) True flies are insects of the order Diptera, the name being derived from the Greek di = two, and ptera = wings. Insects of this order use only a single pair of wings to fly, the hindwings being reduced to club-like balancing organs known as halteres. Diptera is a large order containing an estimated 1,000,000 species including horse-flies, crane flies, hoverflies and others, although only about 150,000 species have been described.

GREAT Daily Planner Printables Here!!! (I wasn't able to pick up an image to pin, but these PRINTABLES were just too great & organized for me to pass up!!! <3

http://www.sccs.swarthmore.edu/users/03/cweiss/bugs/glossary.html

Common housefly. Why is the common housefly able to perform complex and precise aerobatic maneuvers? It is because of two tiny appendages called halteres, one located behind each wing.These halteres are found on two-winged insects, such as flies, mosquitoes, and gnats. Like the pendulum of a clock, with their clubbed ends, halteres "beat in one particular direction". (Encyclopedia of Adaptations in the Natural World)The twisting of the haltere makes the fly agile and hard to catch.(g12 11 p…

Crane fly aka "mosquito hawks", "gallinipper", "may fly" "skeeter eater", "gollywhopper" and "whapper" DO NOT KILL THESE BUGS!!!!! I used to think they were faerie

Was It Designed? The Haltere of the Fly ● Why is the common housefly able to perform complex and precise aerobatic maneuvers? When hit by a gust of wind, why can the insect quickly right itself and maintain its course? The answer involves, in part, two tiny appendages called halteres, one located behind each wing. ★ Consider: A haltere is like a tiny drumstick with a knob on the end. During flight, the halteres swing up and down at the same frequency as the wings but in the opposite…

Thank you melvyn yeo. I think this is some sort of mosquito. It appears to have only one set of wings plus halteres. If any one can ID this and even if it is misplaced, I'll gladly move it.