Pinterest • O catálogo mundial de ideias

Quetzalcoatlus northropi is an azhdarchid pterosaur known from the Late Cretaceous of North America (Maastrichtian stage) and one of the largest known flying animals of all time. It is a member of the family Azhdarchidae, a family of advanced toothless pterosaurs with unusually long, stiffened necks. Its name comes from the Mesoamerican feathered serpent god Quetzalcoatl

Steneosaurus bollensis - Steneosaurus is an extinct genus of teleosaurid crocodyliform from the Early Jurassic to Middle Jurassic (Toarcian to Callovian). Fossil specimens have been found in England, France, Germany, Switzerland and Morocco. The largest species, S. heberti, reached up to 5 m (16.5 ft) long, though 2.5–3.5 m was far more common Species in this genus are traditionally classed into two skull groups: longirostrine (long, narrow jaws) and brevirostrine (short, broad jaws)

A 520 million-year-old fossilised nervous system – so well-preserved that individually fossilised nerves are visible – is the most complete and best example yet found, and could help unravel how the nervous system evolved in early animals - Complete specimen of Chengjiangocaris kunmingensis from the early Cambrian Xiaoshiba biota of South China

Xiphactinus (from Latin and Greek for "sword-ray") is an extinct genus of large (4.5 to 6 m (15 to 20 feet) long) predatory marine bony fish that lived during the Late Cretaceous. When alive, the fish would have resembled a gargantuan, fanged tarpon (to which it was, however, not related).The species Portheus molossus described by Cope is a junior synonym of X. audax

pin 10

Muttaburrasaurus was a genus of herbivorous ornithopod dinosaur, which lived in what is now northeastern Australia sometime between 112 and 99.6 million years ago during the early Cretaceous Period. It has been recovered in some analyses as a member of the iguanodontian family Rhabdodontidae.After Kunbarrasaurus, it is Australia's most completely known dinosaur from skeletal remains. It was named after Muttaburra, the site in Queensland, Australia, where it was found

Atopodentatus unicus - Atopodentatus is an extinct genus of marine reptile, possibly basalsauropterygian, known from the early Middle Triassic (Pelsonian substage, Anisian stage) of Luoping County, Yunnan Province, southwestern China. It contains a single species, Atopodentatus unicus.It is thought to have lived between 247 and 242 million years ago, during the Middle Triassic period, about six million years after the Permian extinction

How about a festive red ammolite (Placenticeras sp.) to celebrate the solstice? Brighter days are ahead! Image courtesy of the Natural History Museum, London

pin 1

A 520 million-year-old fossilised nervous system – so well-preserved that individually fossilised nerves are visible – is the most complete and best example yet found, and could help unravel how the nervous system evolved in early animals - Complete specimen of Chengjiangocaris kunmingensis from the early Cambrian Xiaoshiba biota of South China

Genesis 1:20-23 Then God said, “Let the waters swarm with fish and other life. Let the skies be filled with birds of every kind.”

pin 3

Muttaburrasaurus was a genus of herbivorous ornithopod dinosaur, which lived in what is now northeastern Australia sometime between 112 and 99.6 million years ago during the early Cretaceous Period. It has been recovered in some analyses as a member of the iguanodontian family Rhabdodontidae.After Kunbarrasaurus, it is Australia's most completely known dinosaur from skeletal remains. It was named after Muttaburra, the site in Queensland, Australia, where it was found